MYSTERY AND MANHATTAN MURDER MYSTERY

Spoilers ahead, but the movie came out in 1993, so I don’t know if ‘spoilers’ really works in context.
Manhattan Murder Mystery (1993) is the mystery movie you want to re-watch when it’s raining outside and you have a filter coffee. It’s the movie to re-watch when you buy a new velvet bathrobe and want to lounge in it, feeling fancy. This is mostly because of the soundtrack; you have some Reinhardt and Brubeck set against stunning long-shots of Manhattan.

The movie uses the idea of mystery very cleverly, which is why I love it. On the surface you have the Carol and Larry Lipton (Diane Keaton and Woody Allen respectively), who have stumbled across a (possible) murder right across their hallway. But the movie progresses to parody murder mysteries while celebrating them at the same time. You have all these strata of discernibility, and get to pick which works for you.

There’s Carol, who is the kind of person every ‘Five find-outers and the dog’ fan will grow up to be. She sees a mystery and relentlessly pursues it. She hides under the bed when the (possible) murderer returns, only to leave her reading glasses there. Larry is constantly neurotic about it giving us alternative narratives to the murder mystery and lampooning the plausibility of it in the first place.

If this hasn’t charmed you into wearing pearls yet, the movie proceeds to make the viewer feel like they are spying on the Lipton couple spying on their neighbours. We constantly see the proceedings of their armature snooping by seeing the reflection of their actions in mirrors, rather than the action itself. When they follow someone, the camera follows them at a distance, straining at every turn to keep them in view, like we are following them at a distance. Especially during the first viewing, we’re novice detectives ourselves, critiquing every move of Carol and her ally Ted (Alan Alda).

The mysteries in MMM cannot be spoken about without mentioning the climax, where Larry Lipton has confronted (confirmed) murderer Paul House (Jerry Adler). Paul has kidnapped Carol after being made to believe these two rookies have evidence of his crime. Larry comes to free Carol and this leads to a scene where Paul is attempting to shoot Larry, at the back of his dilapidated movie theatre. Here are stacked ornate mirrors, reflecting images onto one another. The old theatre is playing the iconic final scene of The Lady from Shanghai, and the events occur in parallel to what happens in that movie. We are given a glimpse into this madness feeling like we are being persecuted as well, the mirrors reflect multiple images of Paul pointing a gun towards incoming sound (which points to the screen, obviously).

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MMM plays around with the nature of mysteries but the best of all are its use of comedy in mystery. Witty dialogue and acting aside, the mystery in itself is amusing; its premise, the conventional nature of the main characters and the fact that total common folk are committing and cracking this case, and the way they go about it makes for a very engaging mystery.

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